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Water treatment Water treatment

GAWB supplies drinking water to its customers via two conventional drinking water treatment plants. GAWB also owns, operates and maintains distribution mains and several reservoirs, supplying bulk drinking water to a number of industrial customers and to the Gladstone Regional Council, who manage the reticulation of drinking water to domestic users.

 Gladstone Water Treatment Plant Overview

The Gladstone Water Treatment Plant, located on Bruce Street in the suburbs of Gladstone, was originally constructed in 1972 as a 14 megalitre per day plant. It has since undergone a number of upgrades and now has an overall capacity of 57 megalitres per day (that's equivalent to the volume of about 23 olympic sized-swimming pools). On average, the plant produces around 24 megalitres per day; however this fluctuates depending on the season and weather conditions.

Source water for the plant is pumped from Lake Awoonga and fed through a series of pipelines and raw water storage reservoirs, before been gravity fed to the plant. 

Water treatment process

The Gladstone Water Treatment Plant uses a process known as 'conventional water treatment' to produce safe drinking water. This includes a series of chemical and physical processes to remove dissolved and suspended particles from the water and disinfection to kill pathogens. Typically, the conventional process uses;

  • Coagulation with aluminium sulphate and a polyelectrolyte coagulant aid, followed by flocculation and clarification to remove the majority of suspended material from the water column;
  • Rapid filtration through a dual media of anthracite and sand to polish the water;
  • pH correction with soda ash to bring the water to an optimal pH range; and
  • Disinfection with sodium hypochlorite, to destroy any potential pathogens.

The water treatment process is continuously monitored by the WTP operators and via online instrumentation to ensure it meets drinking water specifications 100% of the time.

Water used in processes, such as filter backwashing, is recovered and returned to the bulk raw water network for industry to use. 

Features

Key features of the treatment infrastructure include:

  • The ability to dose Powder Activated Carbon to remove dissolved contaminants;
  • Two circular upflow clarifiers;
  • 3 Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) units;
  • 12 dual-media anthracite/sand filters;
  • 2.25 megalitre clearwater balancing reservoir; and
  • A high lift and low lift pump set, for distributing water to the network. 

 

Yarwun Water Treatment Plant Overview

The Yarwun Water Treatment Plant, located on Reid Road in the Yarwun Industrial Estate, was constructed in 1989 as a 3 megalitre per day plant.  It has recently been upgraded to produce 5 megalitres per day, to meet the increasing demand in the northern industrial region. On average, the plant produces around 4.3 megalitres per day.

Source water for the plant is pumped from Lake Awoonga and fed through a series of pipelines and raw water storage reservoirs, before been gravity fed to the plant. 

Water Treatment Process

The Yarwun Water Treatment Plant uses a process known as 'conventional water treatment' to produce safe drinking water. This includes a series of chemical and physical processes to remove dissolved and suspended particles from the water and disinfection to kill pathogens. Typically, the conventional process uses;

  • Coagulation with aluminium sulphate and a polyelectrolyte coagulant aid, followed by flocculation and clarification to remove the majority of suspended material from the water column;
  • Rapid filtration through a mono media of sand to polish the water;
  • pH correction with soda ash to bring the water to an optimal pH range; and
  • Disinfection with sodium hypochlorite, to destroy any potential pathogens.

The water treatment process is continuously monitored by the WTP operators and via online instrumentation to ensure it meets drinking water specifications 100% of the time.

Water used in processes, such as filter backwashing, is recovered and recycled through the plant.

Features

Key features of the treatment infrastructure include:

  • The ability to dose Powder Activated Carbon to remove dissolved contaminants;
  • One circular upflow clarifiers;
  • 3 mono-media sand filters;
  • 1 megalitre clearwater balancing reservoir; and
  • A high lift pump set, for distributing water to the network.